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Iceland lowers mackerel quota by 15%

05 Feb 2013
“The 15 per cent reduction in the weight of our catch aligns with the recommendations from international scientific experts,” said Steingrímur J. Sigfússon.

“The 15 per cent reduction in the weight of our catch aligns with the recommendations from international scientific experts,” said Steingrímur J. Sigfússon.

Iceland has reduced its fishing quota for mackerel to help assure the sustainability of the stock.

The Icelandic Ministry of Industries and Innovation has announced that Iceland is cutting its 2013 fishing quota for mackerel by 15%, lowering the catch to 123,182 tons. The Ministry says that this cut from the 2012 quota is in alignment with scientific recommendations from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES).

The Ministry says that this cut is part of Iceland’s commitment to ensure the long-term sustainability of the mackerel stock, and is the second year in a row that Iceland has lowered its catch quota.

“Iceland is taking fewer mackerel from the sea in 2013. The 15 per cent reduction in the weight of our catch aligns with the recommendations from international scientific experts,” said Steingrímur J. Sigfússon, the Minister of Industries and Innovation. “Our 2013 mackerel quota continues our efforts to help preserve the mackerel stock, which is our top priority.”

The minister has also said that Iceland is prepared to reduce its catch further if other Coastal States (the EU, Norway and the Faroe Islands) do so as well.

However, despite this reduction, Ian Gatt, chief executive of the Scottish Pelagic Fishermen’s Association, has said that despite reducing the mackerel quota by 15%, Iceland is still taking an excessively large share.

“It is important to highlight that while Iceland’s share allocation demands are based on 15% of the total catch, the actual quota they have set themselves is close to 23%,” he said. “This is an issue that can only be resolved by negotiation and the onus is on both Iceland and the Faroes to table a realistic counter offer so as to get the negotiating process rolling again.”

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“The 15 per cent reduction in the weight of our catch aligns with the recommendations from international scientific experts,” said Steingrímur J. Sigfússon.

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