US turning a corner in ending overfishing

09 Mar 2011
Eric Schwaab, Assistant Administrator for NOAA Fisheries. Credit: NOAA

Eric Schwaab, Assistant Administrator for NOAA Fisheries. Credit: NOAA

Assistant NOAA Administrator for Fisheries Eric Schwaab has said that the US is making good progress toward meeting the mandate to end domestic overfishing.

“We know that nearly $31 billion in sales and as many as 500,000 jobs are lost because our fisheries are not performing as well as they would if all stocks were rebuilt,” Schwaab said at a hearing in front of the Senate Commerce Committee on the Magnuson-Stevens Act. “While we are turning a corner toward a brighter future for fishermen and fishing communities, many fishermen are struggling in part as a result of years of decline in fishing opportunity.”

Schwaab said that NOAA is committed to working with fishermen and communities during this period of transition.

The US’s fisheries have been vital to the economics and identities of its coastal communities for hundreds of years. According to the most recent estimates, US commercial and saltwater recreational fisheries support almost two million jobs and generate more than $160 billion in sales.

Schwaab talked about fishery management challenges, including improving collection, analysis, and accuracy of scientific information used to manage both recreational and commercial fisheries. He indicated that NOAA Fisheries will continue to work hard with the regional fishery management councils, fishermen and the coastal communities to increase confidence in the management system and ensure productive and efficient fisheries.

“We have turned a corner in our management of fisheries in this country, and the sacrifices made and being made by so many who rely on this industry are showing great promise,” Schwaab said. “As we end overfishing and rebuild stocks, we will increase the economic output of our fisheries, improve the economic conditions for our fishermen, and create better, more stable and sustainable jobs and opportunities in our coastal communities.”

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