Multi-purpose newbuilds for Boulogne

10 Sep 2017
Multi-purpose newbuilds for Boulogne

Rose de Cascia is the first of a trio of trawler/seine netters for Boulogne

The Padmos shipyard in Stellendam has delivered a new combination trawler/seine netter to a new venture in Boulogne, the first of a series of new vessels for the port.

Some years ago, aware that trawlers were being sold away and their fishing rights were going with them, Boulogne PO CME was instrumental in setting up Scopale, in association with Scapêche, the Pêcheurs d’Opale co-operative and the Le Garrec fishing company.

A separate company, Acanor, was established to buy vessels from fishermen wanting to leave the industry, and to sell the boats on, while holding on to the fishing rights so that they could be attached to new vessels built for joint ventures between skipper/owners and Scopale.

The first of these new 19.20 by 7.50 metre fishing vessels, Rose de Cascia, has been delivered to skipper José Leprêtre and has started fishing from Boulogne. The second is due this month and the third before the end of the year, with the venture expected to be extended further next year.

Under the agreement between Scopale and the owners, Scopale retains a minimum of 51% ownership and will buy out a partner who wants to retire, ensuring that the fishing rights remain in Boulogne.

The hulls of the three new trawler/seine netters are built at the Manche Industrie Marine yard in Dieppe, and towed to Padmos in Holland for fitting out. The boats have Mitsubishi main engines and Padmos winches with capacity for 2500 metres of 42mm seine rope and clutchable secondary drums for trawl warp, allowing the same set of deck equipment to be used for both methods of fishing.

The Padmos yard has built up a great deal of experience in building and converting seine netters, having converted the entire DLM fleet to seine netting, as well as a couple of Boulogne trawlers that have been switched to this method.

The design of Rose de Cascia and its sister vessels drawn on the design of the innovative MDV-1 that Padmos and the Hoekman shipyard between them delivered two years ago to Dutch owners.

The bow design also contributed to a highly efficient use of space inside the hull, providing a fishroom capacity of 1170 boxes, similar to that of a traditional 24m vessel. Rose de Cascia is expected to work fairly short trips in the eastern Channel and southern North Sea, landing twice a week in Boulogne