High-res ocean forecasts could make business easier

25 Oct 2017
eSA-Marine gives access to immediate ocean data Photo: South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI

eSA-Marine gives access to immediate ocean data Photo: South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI

South Australia's fishing and aquaculture sectors now have access to high resolution real-time ocean forecasts of ocean currents which should help make business a little easier.

A revolutionary mapping system called eSA-Marine provides forecasts of sea level, water temperature, ocean currents and wind which can be used to predict extreme ocean conditions, maintenance of aquaculture sites and ship routing.

“Immediate access to accurate ocean data will assist in the management of our state’s maritime industries, including fisheries and aquaculture,” said Leon Bignell, Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries.

The eSA-Marine system uses real-time satellite data to capture ocean forecasts ranging from Portland, Victoria, to Thevenard in South Australia’s west, and includes gulfs, shelves and deep waters of the continental slope.

eSA-Marine was developed by researchers from the South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI), the research division of Primary Industries and Regions SA, in partnership with the Bureau of Meteorology and the University of Adelaide.

“Having led the development of eSA-Marine from its inception, it is satisfying to see this research readily accessible and available to our fisheries, aquaculture and maritime industries,” said Professor John Middleton, SARDI researcher.

“eSA-Marine is a unique forecast system, and is in fact one of only two in-shore ocean data assimilating forecast systems in Australia.”

The project was funded by the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation and the Australian Southern Bluefin Tuna Industry Association.

The information is readily available to the public, industry and government on the Primary Industries and Regions SA website

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